FIELD STATION, KERHONKSON, NY
​​​​​​​A developing 6-acre campus of gardens, food forests, and appropriate technology structures. 
A mission to learn and demonstrate how to live abundantly and regeneratively with nature.
A goal to build a community center where we can join in a creative re-imagining of a world that is supportive and regenerative of life in all its forms.
Initial work at the Field Station involved carving out an extensive swale to gather and slow the movement of water across the land. Collecting and retaining water creates boundless opportunities to support plants and reinforce a diversity of ecosystems. This masterplan illustrates the potential for nurseries, gardens, orchards, greenhouses, classrooms, and a network of ponds along the swale. Several of these projects are underway.
REGENERATIVE FOOD FOREST, MEADOW AND MEDICINAL GARDENS
Nurserying young, native plants
Nurserying young, native plants
Ilex verticillata, winterberry, in a restored wetland area.
Ilex verticillata, winterberry, in a restored wetland area.
Introducing native wet meadow plants through seed mixes along the new swale.
Introducing native wet meadow plants through seed mixes along the new swale.
Overwintering smaller natives in nursery.
Overwintering smaller natives in nursery.
A silver spotted skipper, Epargyreus clarus, visting swamp milkweed, Asclepias incarnata,  in restored wetland
A silver spotted skipper, Epargyreus clarus, visting swamp milkweed, Asclepias incarnata, in restored wetland
Fall planting
Fall planting
STRUCTURES
Passive solar classroom building in progress
Passive solar classroom building in progress
Future earth-sheltered greenhouse
Future earth-sheltered greenhouse
Fieldstone retaining walls, steps and microclimate supports
Fieldstone retaining walls, steps and microclimate supports
WATER SYSTEMS
The spring (left), which has been restored since this photo was taken, provides water to gardens at the Field Station. Water travels downstream to several tanks (center) that serve as irrigation reservoirs. Overflow is sent down the swale (right) where it can be reabsorbed into the land. 
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